Psychometric Aptitude Test FAQs

Below we share with you our most frequently asked Psychometric Test questions:

1. What is meant by Psychometric test?

Psychometric tests are a psychological measurement tools designed to assess ability, skills and knowledge in an objective way.

The term aptitude test is often used interchangeably with psychometric test. Every year millions of psychometric test are administered for a wide variety of reasons, and rudimentary forms of testing can be dated back to at least 2200 B.C. Psychometric tests as we know them today are designed to assess broad areas of what a person can do. They tend not to be designed to measure knowledge or skill, rather focus on more general capability – most commonly numerical, verbal and diagrammatic reasoning and situational judgement. They are usually timed, although how much emphasis placed on time is usually dependent on what the test is measuring specifically. This can also test ability to work under pressure.

Psychometric tests offer a very effective mechanism for screening and selecting candidates in the early stages of a recruitment process, with over 1/3 of employers using testing as part of their recruitment process.

2. What is the meaning of an aptitude test?

Aptitude is natural, unlearned ability to do something. Therefore an aptitude test is designed to assess innate capability.

The terms psychometric test and aptitude test are often used interchangeably, and are used by over 1/3 of employers and c.70% of top graduate employers to screen and select candidates. The tests should be used to assess ability that will be relevant to roles being recruited, and therefore most commonly assess numerical, verbal and diagrammatic reasoning as these are relevant to many jobs. The tests are often timed, also assessing how candidates perform under pressure.

3. What is on the Aptitude Test?

The term aptitude test is often used interchangeably with psychometric test. Aptitude tests will vary depending on the role and employer, but most often are timed tests assessing general abilities that will be required in the role being recruited.

Most commonly assessed is numerical, verbal and diagrammatic reasoning as these are required for many jobs. Questions will vary in complexity according to ability required to fulfil the role, but often will be relatively basic arithmetic, for example (in numerical tests) but under tough timed conditions to assess ability to work quickly but accurately under pressure.

4. What can you have an aptitude for?

Aptitude means a natural tendency or ability for something. So you can have an aptitude for anything!! But generally it’s used to describe a natural flare for something that requires skill – maths, painting or singing for example.

5. What does it mean to have an aptitude for something?

Aptitude for something means innate ability. So to have aptitude for maths might mean that you have a natural capability to work with numbers and this could be tested with a numerical reasoning test.

6. What is the SHL test?

SHL is one of the largest and leading test providers for employers. Many employers use SHL tests because they are well regarded in the market. They provide a wide variety of test solutions, but numerical, verbal and diagrammatic reasoning are among the most popular.

7. What is a verbal reasoning test?

A verbal reasoning test is designed to assess the comprehension skills of candidates.

A verbal reasoning test will vary according to the employer and ability level required for the role being recruited. Generally, tests are made up for between 10 and 20 multiple choice questions. The question format is typically a short paragraph of text which the candidate must interpret and answer a question about. Sometimes this might be a ‘True, False, Cannot Say’ question, and it also might be a specific question on the content of the text. The tests are usually timed, and the emphasis that is placed on time will depend on what the test is measuring, but the timed conditions can also indicate a candidate’s ability to work quickly and accurately under pressure.

8. What is a numerical reasoning test?

A numerical test is designed to assess how well candidates analyse and interpret numerical data quickly and accurately under time pressure.

A numerical reasoning test will vary according to the employer and ability level required for the role being recruited. Generally, tests are made up for between 10 and 20 multiple choice questions. The question format is typically an infographic of numerical information, graph or chart which the candidate must interpret and answer a question about. The tests are usually timed, and the emphasis that is placed on time will depend on what the test is measuring, but the timed conditions can also indicate a candidate’s ability to work quickly and accurately under pressure.

9. What happens during a test?

Tests will vary depending on the employer and the role being recruited for. Generally tests will be timed, also assessing ability to work quickly and accurately under pressure. Tests can be administered online, but are also sometimes in paper form at an assessment centre, for example. There are usually between 10 and 20 questions to answer where there will be some information for the candidate to interpret with multiple choice answers for the candidate to select. Candidates must complete the test in one sitting and it is not possible to pause tests once started.

10. What kind of information will be included during the test?

There are usually between 10 and 20 questions to answer where there will be some information for the candidate to interpret with multiple choice answers for the candidate to select. Unless otherwise instructed it’s very important that candidates only use the information provided in the question to form an answer. This is particularly important in verbal reasoning assessments.

11. Who uses verbal reasoning tests?

Over 1/3 of employers use aptitude tests in their recruitment processes and 67% of top graduate employers use verbal tests.

12. Are verbal reasoning tests fair?

Well designed and administered tests are accepted as fair. There is also extensive research that correlates performance on tests to overall job performance where verbal reasoning ability is relevant to the role being recruited for.

13. What's the best way to prepare for a psychometric test?

Question practice is the best way to prepare for a psychometric test and improve performance. It’s also important to concentrate your revision time on the tests you find the hardest, it’s important that you improve your weakest areas because these are the ones that are likely to let you down in your real psychometric test assessments.